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A Quick-Start Guide to Product Launch Videos

What questions you need to ask and what to do with the answers.

This guide is for a 15 second video but the same principles will work for 30 and 60 second videos as well. I chose 15 seconds because you can make a few of them in a reasonable amount of time and then split test them to understand what is working and what isn’t.

QUESTIONS TO ASK

Before you start developing a concept, you will need to ask some important questions to shed light on what direction to take with the concept.

Product Launch Video Quick-Start PDF

CLICK HERE

To download the interactive PDF and fill in your answers.

1

Who are the competitors?

  • What makes your product unique or better than their offerings?

  • What does their branding and marketing design style look like?

  • What problems do they show solutions for?

2

Who is the target market?

  • How old are they and where do they live?

  • What is their lifestyle, how do they dress?

  • What are their interests?

  • Are there any unique attributes about them?

  • Is there any specific language they use?

3

What problems does the product solve?

  • What are some pain points users of the product have?

  • Rank the top 3 pain points in order of relatability.

  • What unique features will customers appreciate about the product?

  • What are the product's adversaries? (Ex. scissors vs. wire, thick fabric, leather, etc. or sunglasses vs. sun, glare, etc.

DEVELOPING THE CONCEPT

There are infinite ways to skin this cat, but here are 3 frequently used strategies that consistently work. Oftentimes, the type of product dictates the best approach. These strategies are based on videos with a duration of 15 seconds. Use your answers from above to construct these video concepts below.

4

What environment is the product is used in?

  • Indoors, outdoors, or a very specific environment?

  • What time of day is it used?

  • Are there any unique attributes about the environment?

PICK THE MUSIC FIRST

This way of working backwards makes your video go from looking like a song was slapped on top, to looking like a custom score was created for it. Premiumbeats.com is a great resource for great songs with 15 second versions of most of their songs. Once you have the right song, listen to it over and over and break it down into 4 parts.

A

Problem & Solution Strategy

  • Establish a situation where your product is the solution to a problem. (4 sec)

    • Think about the product adversaries

  • Show a problem being solved by the product or product feature. (4 sec)

    • Pull from the unique features your customers will appreciate.

  • Hero shot of the product. Strong tagline that sells the product. (4 sec)

    • Full product hero shot with lighting that accentuates the shape and materials

  • CTA. Tell the viewer where to find more information and buy. (3 sec)

    • Show the product in an environment where it was the solution

B

Daydream Strategy

  • Establish an ideal environment where the product is used. (4 sec)

    • What does your target market daydream about?

  • Show the product how it is ideally used in that environment. (4 sec)

    • Pull from the unique features your customers will appreciate.

  • Hero shot of the product. Strong tagline that sells the product. (4 sec)

    • Full product hero shot with lighting that accentuates the shape and materials

  • CTA. Tell the viewer where to find more information and buy. (3 sec)

    • Show the product in its ideal environment

PRE-PRODUCTION

Start putting the pieces together to create a blueprint for the final video production.

C

Product Features Strategy

  • Show the most visually appealing feature. (4 sec)

    • What feature will make customers think, “oh wow, that looks awesome”

  • Show the most functionally appealing feature. (4 sec)

    • What feature will make customers think, “oh wow, I could use that”

  • Hero shot of the product. Strong tagline that sells the product. (4 sec)

    • Full product hero shot with lighting that accentuates the shape and materials

  • CTA. Tell the viewer where to find more information and buy. (3 sec)

    • Show the product in simple environment

1

Creative Exploration

It is a good idea to do a little creative exploration. Use Pinterest, Behance, Dribbble, Vimeo and YouTube to start getting some creative inspiration. Here is a Pinterest board I aggregated with well-designed videos and images if you are struggling to find your own.

2

Storyboards

Now that you have a concept for the video, you may want to storyboard the idea so you can visually dial in what is happening in each scene. Keep in mind you only have around 4 seconds, so the action needs to be simple and clear. For my storyboards, I like to use rectangular boxes with a visual description below each frame. Boords.com is a good site with solid tools that allow you to create storyboards and plan out your video.

PRODUCTION

The process of creating all of the scenes of the video and compiling them together for the final product.

Your concept may require live action, animation, motion graphics, actors, drones, high speed cameras, sound effects, etc. If you are doing it yourself, it is a good idea to create a checklist of everything you will need. It is also good to create a production schedule so you have full control over each scene being created and don’t leave any important details out.

 

Creating videos from concept to final production can be hard but just take it step-by-step and don’t rush the pre-production process. This outline can’t take you further from here as each production is so different depending on the video but this should lay down a solid foundation to start from.

 

This guide was created by LYTR Co. We are an Emmy award winning animation company specializing in product launch, and explainer videos. If you have questions or want to discuss any production needs, please reach out for a free 45 min video consultation.

3

Animatic

Once your storyboards are done, and your music is chosen, you can create a quick edit with the story boards blocked out into the 4 different parts of the song. This is called an animatic and it helps you feel out the pace and flow of the video. Try and have the cuts of each scene align to the beat of the song. Once the animatic is dialed in, you have a good idea of the exact duration of each shot and you can substitute the static images for produced video as you move through production.

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